Emissions

Actions You Can Do to Fight Climate Change

Climate change isn’t good for the environment.

Its effect can be critical to our health and the environment. It is something that we should take seriously for us to have a better future.

Some of climate change’s effects are sea level rise, melting of sea ice, and intense heat waves. These can affect our lives negatively. To help you decrease the effect and fight climate change, here are some actions you can do to fight climate change.

Reduce Emissions

Transportations release carbon dioxide. This is one of the causes of climate change. Whenever possible, use a sustainable transportation instead. You can use a public transportation such as train or bicycle. Carbon dioxide is harmful to our overall health and the atmosphere.

Save more energy

Don’t leave unused appliances idle for a long time. Saving energy helps decrease the effect of climate change. Also, you’ll save more money and energy at the same time which is good.

Act against deforestation

Deforestation
We Have To Act Quick To Prevent This.

Trees help us in many ways.

It helps fight climate change by absorbing tons of carbon dioxide. In addition, they also help absorb the water in case of floods. There are countless benefits that we get out of plants. We enjoy products made with them like coffee, tea, tobacco and wine. If you want to check out the types of tea plants and their benefits, check out this tea brochure.

The 3 R’s

These simple activities can help our environment a lot. Reducing, reusing, and recycling, are very effective solutions against climate change. Consuming less means more productivity. Reusing helps save money and reduce consumptions. Finally, recycling helps save kilos of carbon dioxide from the waste materials.

These activities are very simple to do. Start your fight against climate change! Together let’s act to achieve a pollution-free environment. Doing these small actions can cause a huge effect on climate change.

 

Reducing Foodprint with These Easy Steps

Reducing carbon footprint also means taking a look at my food choices. I’m not a vegetarian and I’m not sure if I’m ready to make that level of commitment yet. But I’m gradually weaning myself off too much meat. I prefer taking a slow and steady approach on this. I have a better chance of making this work for me if I don’t feel like being rushed through the process. Here are some things I find helpful as I take on this challenge:

Source: www.ewg.org
Source: www.ewg.org

Buying only what’s needed

I find planning meals quite helpful in minimizing food waste. It also made it easier for me to buy only what I need when at the supermarket. With a shopping list in hand, I’m able to avoid buying unnecessary items that often end up in the trash.

Committing to a meat-free day

For someone who loves meat, committing to one meat-free day every week is a big step. It was a huge challenge for me in the beginning. It was quite tempting to cheat when the craving starts. But it got easier in the long run. I could even do this twice a week now. I’m still not prepared to take that leap towards a vegetarian lifestyle. But I’m working on eating less meat now.

Checking use-by-dates

I used to throw items that have reached their use-by dates. But I’ve learned that some foods are still safe to eat even after past the indicated date. I’ve also learned that the best way to avoid letting a lot of food go to waste is to check their use-by dates before I buy them. As for fresh produce, I make sure that I just buy the right amount I need.

Paying attention to portion sizes when dining out

I’ve inadvertently wasted food when dining out in the past. This was back when I didn’t pay much attention to portion sizes. Now I’ve made it a habit to go for the smaller portions. Or simply ordering whatever’s on the menu that I know I can finish on my own.

Taking out what’s left

One simple way to avoid wasting food when eating out is to bring home what’s left. I’ve been doing this more lately. This is one of the things that may not seem like much in the greater scheme of things. But I like the thought that I’ve reduced my foodprint even just a little by doing it.

Car Free Day – The Perks of Driving Less

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Taking on a personal challenge to save gasoline not only meant following the advices I’ve read about fine-tuning my car to make it more efficient. I also decided to commit to a car free day at least twice a month, at least in the beginning, to see how it works for me. It wasn’t an easy decision to make since I’m used to driving myself around. It’s always been more convenient for me, especially if I need to rush. Here’s how this car free day have been working out for me. One thing I can say, it has indeed resulted to some savings on my part.

Carpooling

I took a two-pronged approach to this carpooling idea. I enlisted the help of my family and started sending feelers at the office to people who live near me. Luckily, both strategies worked. I was able to rely on both during my initial twice a month car free days. I immediately saw the advantages of the arrangement. All of us who carpooled were able to save on driving costs. While I’m used to driving, I have to say that it was nice to just ride in the car from time to time. Another perk was that it gave me the chance to catch up with my family and friends from work. It was far from the often quiet trips I make to the office on my own.

Public transportation

Taking the bus and subway took some adjustments on my part. I was initially worried about getting late. I’ve experienced being delayed in the past because of unforeseen problems on the road not to mention the unexpected traffic. The only solution was for me to leave earlier than usual. But despite the occasional annoyances and inconveniences, I’m beginning to appreciate the advantages of going for this option. And it wasn’t as stressful as I thought it would be.

Bike to work

I haven’t done this yet although I’ve seen some people at work doing this. I don’t think that I’m ready to make this kind of commitment. But I do see the advantages. One of the biggest draws of this idea is that I’d be getting the exercise I normally have trouble squeezing in my regular schedule. If this works for me, I’d probably be driving less than I still do now.

Walking

I may not be walking my way to the office given how far it is from home. But I’ve been doing a lot more walking lately since I started using public transportation. On car free days, I have to walk at least one block from the bus stop. I have to say this whole taking the bus or subway thing has been keeping me fit.